COUNTRY FOCUS: GHANA



Ghana has abundant valuable natural resources, including gold, oil, diamonds and aluminum. Historically, Ghana’s dominant economic resource was gold, and the chance to exploit this resource drew Portuguese, Dutch, Danish, German and British merchants, who called Ghana the “Gold Coast.” Ghana supplied up to 10 per cent of Europe’s gold imports in the late 15th century. Since the 1990s, it has been Africa’s second largest producer of gold.

From the bustle of downtown Accra to the atmospheric adobe villages of the north, from the ancient Kingdom of Asante to the medieval mosques of Larabnga and Bole, it is a country whose immense cultural diversity both thrills and fascinates visitors, drawing them into a daily rhythm that is uniquely and unmistakably African. A common feature of all Ghanaian cultures is a love of festivals. Barely a week goes without one or other town or village holding its major annual celebration, while everyday personal events such as funerals, name-giving ceremonies and weddings tend also to be imbued with something of a carnival atmosphere.
The normal starting point for exploring Ghana is the historical capital Accra, one of the safest and most navigable of African cities, and brimming with interest. Accra’s atmospheric older quarters Ushertown and Jamestown are characterized by an architectural cocktail spanning several centuries, spiced with striking landmarks such as the 17th century Osu Castle and Jamestown Lighthouse. 
TOURIST SITES
Amongst some of the fun things to do include; 
  • Visit Paga- a sacred crocodile sanctuary, Although crocodiles are considered as wild creatures, the Paga crocodiles are friendly and coexist with humans. It is a customary offence to harm, kill or show any sign of disrespect to the crocodile of Paga. It is not uncommon to find children and or visitors sitting at the back of or holding the tale of a crocodile without any harm, after a sacrifice of fowl. This is normal for the people of Paga but a mystery to visitors.
  • Boti Falls is located just 17km North-east of Koforidua, the eastern regional capital. For those interested in how soon it takes to get there, it is just over 30 minutes drive from Koforidua. Two attractions that are also available for visitors to see but not directly related to the falls are the umbrella rock and the three –head- palm tree.


  • The village of Cape Three Points is the southernmost community in Ghana, and its beach is one of the most beautiful along Ghana’s West Coast.
  • Kwame Nkrumah Mausoleum, also known as the Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park(KNMP) is the last resting place of the first President of Ghana, Osagyefo Dr Kwame Nkrumah. The Museum houses the personal effects and publications of Ghana’s first president and pictures showing his life history.


  • Lake Volta lies along the Greenwich Meridian, and just six degrees of latitude north of the Equator. The lake is formed by the Akosombo Dam, which was originally conceived by the geologist Albert Ernest Kitson in 1915, but whose construction only began in 1961 with completion in 1965.
No culture would be complete with just the tourism and economy of the said country. Traditional attributes and food habits are also some of the reasons why we love Ghana. From street food faves to Local delicacies, Ghana is sprawling with food for every foodie.









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